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4’33” Time for a Circular Economy

Gebonden Engels 2017 9789052846392
Verwachte levertijd ongeveer 8 werkdagen

Samenvatting

John Cage wrote 4'33" as a modern music work (1953). It is not played by performers using instruments, but tacet: instruments are not used at all. This does not mean it is a silent work. It is a creation built up of ambient sounds, of that which is present in the moment.

Silence is the invitation to explore what truth is and experience that truth is an unfolding quality within each of us. The essence is that that the supposed division between ourselves and others or our environment is recognised to be an illusion. Cage wanted to remove all traces of the ego of the composer in this work. The way the performance sounds is not about the composer, but about the collective - or field - in the audience.

The realisation of a circular economy presupposes a mind shift. The challenge is to abstain from an ego-economy ('I', materialism and competition) and work towards an eco-economy ('we', values and sharing). This process is supported by personal growth. Silence and attention to personal development is crucial and a key factor in society as well as in education.

Specificaties

ISBN13:9789052846392
Taal:Engels
Bindwijze:gebonden
Aantal pagina's:260
Uitgever:Pumbo.nl
Druk:1
Verschijningsdatum:12-12-2017
Hoofdrubriek:Economie

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Inhoudsopgave

4’33” Time for a Circular Economy 013

1. Circular Economy - a Developmental Perspective 015
1.1. Introduction - Circular Economy 015
1.2. Circular Economy as a social complex phenomenon 017
1.3. Principal approaches to and definitions of circular economy 018
1.4. Transdisciplinary approach to the circular economy 020
1.5. Economic growth and industrial revolution 024
1.6. Change of heart: limits to growth 025
1.7. Circular economy as a developmental perspective 033
1.8. Active in practice – The Natural Step 037
1.9. Conclusion 038

2. Biomimicry: Nature as a Foundation for a Circular Economy 041
2.1. Introduction 041
2.2. Our relationship with nature 043
2.3. What is biomimicry? 047
2.4. What is development? 051
2.5. Development in the natural world 057
2.6. Biomimicry as a development step for a circular economy 058
2.7. Impact on education 060


3. A move towards Circular Economy: The Natural Step 063
3.1. Introduction 063
3.2. Three metaphors for organisations 065
3.3. Personal story 068
3.4. Introduction to The Natural Step 069
3.5. The framework for strategic sustainable development 072
3.6. Applying The Natural Step Framework 075
3.7. Case studies 077
3.8. Closing remarks 079

4. IT’s the Circular Economy Revolution! 083
4.1. Introduction 083
4.2. Lessons from the past: changes in domestic mode of production 083
4.3. Lessons in disruption 085
4.4. Key factors in socioeconomic transition 087
4.5. The Circular Economy 088
4.6. Consumer behaviour as a critical factor 091
4.7. Introducing Blockchain: towards an internet of value 093
4.8. Blockchain in practice: examples of an upcoming phenomenon 094
4.9. The ‘dark side’ of Blockchain 098
4.10. Potential benefits of Block-chain to a circular economy 101
4.11. Aftermath 104

5. The Great Turning: is it the essential adventure of our time? 109
5.1. Introduction 109
5.2. Money and Sustainability 110
5.3. The need for a Monetary Ecosystem 112
5.4. residential sector and nine ways to an energy-backed currency 113
5.5. Case: the DuurzaamDoor project in Maastricht 115
5.6. Blockchain technology and sustainability 117
5.7. Strategy development: linking smart use of energy and labour 118
5.8. All Quadrants, all Levels, again 119
5.9. DuurzaamDoor & all Quadrants, all Levels 120
5.10. Tell me... Why 121
5.11. Transcend to the second tier 122 5.12. Newly acquired insights 123
5.13. Relevance for education 124

6. Circular Economy and New Business Models 127
6.1. The Chicken Caravan and the Green Forest egg 127
6.2. A personal view of the Circular Economy 129
6.3. What’s in a name? 135
6.4. New Business Models in the WEconomy 137
6.5. Theory in practice 148
6.6. Reflection and conclusions 150

7. The circular economy: an evolving policy field and network 153
7.1. Introduction 153
7.2. Context 154
7.3. Policy context 158
7.4. Noord-Brabant 165
7.5. In conclusion 173

8. The economy of happiness 177
8.1. Introduction 177
8.2. From Hurricane Katrina to King Willem Alexander 179
8.3. From script to growth 182
8.4. From having to being 184
8.5. From transaction to participation 186
8.6. Practical cases 190
8.7. Reflection 197
8.8. Conclusion 199

9. Circular learning, a system transition 201
9.1. Background and need 201
9.2. Designing outside the system 202
9.3. Towards a new paradigm for learning and education 204
9.4. Transition in education 206
9.5. What next? 209
9.6. I want to do something… 210
9.7. Conclusion 211

10. A Paradigm of Circular Economy –Beyond the Divide 213
10.1. Introduction 213
10.2. Disconnection from the sources of life 214
10.3. Worldviews 218
10.4. Aspects of Consciousness 220
10.5. The thinker and the painter 221
10.6. Practical pathways, political dilemmas and truth 225
10.7. Welfare equals wellbeing and happiness? 228
10.8. On learning for a circular economy 230

11. conclusion 235
11.1. Introduction 235
11.2. Themes 238
11.3. The slow progress of time 248

Authors - curriculum vitae 250

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